From the LaunchPad

Welcome to The Launchpad, SoundRocket’s blog, where we share our insights and musings on the science of doing science (well), #soundscience.

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Assessing event-based college student drinking and social context using mobile devices

Assessing event-based college student drinking and social context using mobile devices

Most surveys of alcohol-use ask about behaviors and patterns that happen days, weeks months or even years ago. It’s all retrospective recollection from study participants. It’s useful for identifying general trends but it’s fraught with measurement errors.  And when the topic of the study is binge drinking, errors involving memory can increase. — even if you’re asking the question the next day.

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Examining the Feasibility of Using SMS When Surveying College Students

Examining the Feasibility of Using SMS When Surveying College Students

ext messages (also known as Short Message Service, or SMS) are more and more becoming the go-to medium of communication. This especially is the case for today’s college students, who seem to conduct their social and even business lives completely via their smartphone.

Scott Crawford and the team at SoundRocket looked at the data surrounding the efficacy of using SMS when surveying college students, resulting in a presentation at the 2013 American Association of Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) Conference.

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Why We Do Checklists

Why We Do Checklists

It has been a while since I have communicated about the importance of checklists.  It feels that the time is right to do so again… as it will become a more and more important element to what we do as we grow.

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Six Common Mistakes in Survey Research

Survey research is a part of the scientific process – and even a science on its own.  So why do researchers abandon the science when they implement their studies?  An astronomer would not go to the hobby store to buy a telescope to study the galaxy.  A geneticist would never purchase non-sterile test tubes from an unknown source to capture saliva samples from research subjects.  So why do social scientists routinely treat their own data collection tools this way?   

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